The integration of Microsoft Buy Now, Pay Later in Edge is very controversial

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Microsoft announced a new addition to the company’s Microsoft Edge web browser in mid-November. Available only in Insider versions of Edge at the time, the feature was recently rolled out in Edge 96 Stable.

Microsoft has decided to add support for a Buy Now, Pay Later service, provided by ZIP, in Edge. Services such as Zip or Afterpay offer so-called Buy Now, Pay Later (BNPL) services. Buyers can use them to get items they buy immediately and pay for those items in installments over time.

Microsoft in partnership with Zip and Edge users can use the Zip service when they make purchases between $ 35 and $ 1,000 in the browser, even if the shopping site does not support it.

Edge’s built-in BNPL is limited to repaying money owed in 4 installments over 6 weeks.

Microsoft notes that the integration improves the application process.

Applying BNPL may take a long time, you have to log in with zip every time. With BNPL in Edge, you can just link your Microsoft account to your zip account with one click and then bypass the connection from the Zip side. This can speed up the application process for you.

What Microsoft doesn’t reveal in the announcement is that Zip is only available in certain regions. According to the homepage, Zip is available in the US, UK, Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and Mexico.

How the Buy Now, Pay Later services work

The Buy Now, Pay Later services seem to be useful services at first glance. You can use them to get an item or service right away, but you don’t have to pay the full amount right away. If you’re running out of money right now, but need something right away, they may be the only option to do it unless you sell your soul to a money lender.

There are some drawbacks to using these services. Some may charge a fee each time you make payments and others may charge a monthly accounting fee. Late payment fees come into play when customers miss payments, and these can be reported and affect the line of credit.

Reception was poor

Microsoft’s own blog post on the Insider Blog has received over 110 comments at the time of writing. The majority of reviews are negative for the functionality. Some see it as unnecessary bloat that is added to the browser, others mention that Microsoft didn’t mention the $ 4 processing fee or how it benefits from the integration.

Here are some examples:

It should be an extension at best. It’s not a feature I look for in any browser. Microsoft is a multi-billion dollar company. I doubt what Zip pays you is worth the negative press it will generate. (bdpatton user)

Also created an account just to respond. I love the new Edge and have been using it since its release. Seriously, can’t stand it. Nobody needs this. BNPL is just a facilitator for people who have a problem. No one should fund such small online purchases. This kind of functionality should certainly, 100% never be in any browser. Please don’t add to the debt problems people already have. (amsprich user)

Looks like you forgot to mention the $ 4 flat fee in the article?

On a purchase of $ 35, this represents 11% of the purchase cost spread over a month. annualized, that’s an astonishing APY of 250%. Even the most predatory credit cards cap at around 40% APY.

All you have done is just integrate predatory loans into your browser. Honestly, you should be ashamed of yourself. (JemmaScout user)

Articles, such as Microsoft Edge’s new “Buy Now, Pay Later” feature, which is the definition of bloatware on XDA developers, or Paul Thurott’s Microsoft Continues to Bog Down Edge with Unnecessary Bloat, criticize the integration of functionality.

The XDA developers point out that Zip is already available as a Chrome app and browser extension, and the Buy Now, Pay Later programs are designed to entice people to make more purchases than they otherwise would.

Closing words

What features should browsers provide? Most browser manufacturers add functionality to their browsers that could have been provided as extensions, many do so to distinguish their own browser from others. Some Edge users will find the new feature useful, others will see it as an overload or even a reason to switch to a different browser.

Now you: what do you think of the integration?

Summary

The integration of Microsoft Buy Now, Pay Later in Edge is very controversial

Article name

The integration of Microsoft Buy Now, Pay Later in Edge is very controversial

The description

Microsoft announced a new addition to the company’s Microsoft Edge web browser in mid-November. Available only in Insider versions of Edge at the time, the feature was recently rolled out in Edge 96 Stable.

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Martin Brinkmann

Editor

Ghacks Technology News

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