Microsoft Outlook update will prevent sensitive emails from ending up in the wrong hands

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Business users will soon benefit from improved Microsoft Outlook functionality that will help ensure that sensitive information is kept in the proper circles.

Currently, Microsoft provides a sensitivity label tool, which allows employees to manually dictate the sensitivity status of an email message. There is also an auto-tagging feature that can detect personal identifying information such as social security numbers and payment details.

Hoping to improve the usability of its labeling feature, Microsoft is introducing a new system where Outlook will automatically match the sensitivity of the email with the label applied to attachments.

New Outlook Features

As described in a new entry (opens in a new tab) in the company’s product roadmap, users will benefit from automated alerts suggesting that the sensitivity level of the email needs to be increased to match that of any attachment.

The hope, presumably, is that the measure will force employees to think twice about the content of all attachments and to whom they are sent.

Naturally, as this feature is aimed at enterprises, only certain Enterprise customers will have access to it from the outset. It’s expected to premiere later this year, with general availability slated for January 2023.

As the level of competition among email service providers increases, Microsoft is continually updating its products and adding new features, many of which are designed for business customers.

Running a little late, for example, is the improved support for alias email addresses (opens in a new tab). It has long been possible to receive email addressed to aliases, but Microsoft hopes that allowing users to send from these addresses will improve communication consistency.

At any time, users will be able to “send [an] email from a proxy email address or account alias rather than [their] primary email address” with the proxy kept in the “from” and “reply-to” fields for recipients.

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