Microsoft launches ‘woke’ editing tool that advises editors to type ‘assigned female at birth’

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Microsoft launches ‘woke’ editing tool that advises editors to type ‘female assigned at birth’ rather than ‘biologically female’ after Google introduces ‘inclusive language’ feature to avoid politically incorrect words

  • Microsoft’s new tool advises people to avoid using the term “biologically female”
  • He suggests replacing “postman” with “postier” and “humankind” with “humankind”
  • Critics have accused the company of censoring language used on its platforms
  • Microsoft said the optional feature helps users avoid the involvement of gender bias

Tech giant Microsoft has launched an editing tool that advises writers to type “female assigned at birth” rather than “female biologically”, days after Google introduced an “inclusive language” feature on its editing engine. research.

Microsoft’s new tool, which users can opt out of, advises people to avoid using the term “biologically female,” and suggests replacing “postman” with “postal worker,” “Mrs” with “Mrs,” and “humanity” by ‘humanity’.

The tech company said the feature was introduced to help users avoid any implications of gender bias.

However, critics have accused Microsoft of censoring the language while contradicting the biological meaning of the words “woman” or “female.”

Last week, it was reported that Google had launched an “inclusive language” feature designed to avoid the use of politically incorrect words.

Tech giant Microsoft has launched an editing tool that advises writers to type “female assigned at birth” rather than “biologically female”

Helen Staniland, software developer and feminist activist, told The Telegraph that Microsoft’s new feature appears to be trying to influence the way people discuss social issues and accused the company of “jumping on the bandwagon”.

She said: ‘What do they mean by gender bias? Why do they suggest that the perfectly descriptive phrase “biologically female” might imply gender bias? Why would they assume that “female assigned at birth” might be better?

“It seems like they’re trying to jump on the bandwagon to try to prevent discussion of ‘biological females’, but their suggestions aren’t helping them.”

A Microsoft spokesperson said the new feature could be turned off at any time and stressed that the alternative words were only “suggestions” and not “automatic corrections”.

In a statement, the spokesperson said, “Microsoft understands that not all of the publisher’s suggestions are suitable for all users and all scenarios.” That’s why we let users control their final output.

‘Editor is a completely optional tool that users can enable or disable at any time. The editor doesn’t do any auto-correction, all suggestions are just that – suggestions for the user to consider – and the user has control over which suggestions they choose to use, if any.

“In Word, users will have control over reviews/suggestions as they can turn each one on and off individually.”

Many computer document systems use methods to correct spelling and grammar, but nudging users towards waking language is seen by critics as a step too far.

Testing on Google’s new system revealed some major flaws.

A transcribed interview with former Klu Klux Klan leader David Duke, in which he uses offensive racial slurs and talks about driving out black people, drew no warnings. But he suggested that President John F Kennedy’s inaugural address should say “for all mankind” instead of “for all mankind.”

A Microsoft spokesperson said the new feature could be turned off at any time and pointed out that the alternative words were only

A Microsoft spokesperson said the new feature could be turned off at any time and stressed that the alternative words were only “suggestions” and not “automatic corrections”.

Users typing “owner” would see a warning that it “may not be inclusive for all readers” with the suggestion that they should try “owner” or “proprietary” instead.

Similar to Microsoft, the word “humanity” was a suggested alternative to what Google apparently considers the controversial term “humanity.”

Silkie Carlo, of campaign group Big Brother Watch, told the Sunday Telegraph last week that Google’s new warnings “are not helpful, they are deeply intrusive”.

A Google spokesperson said: “Our technology is constantly improving, and we’re not yet. [have] a solution to identify and mitigate all unwanted word associations and biases.

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