Microsoft gets less generous with OneDrive storage if you use Outlook.com

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For many people, cloud storage is now essential. There’s no shortage of services, but Google Drive and Microsoft’s OneDrive are some of the most popular. For users of Microsoft’s cloud storage, there’s bad news – and we’re not talking about unwanted ads for OneDrive in the Windows 11 Start menu.

The company announced that starting next year it is consolidating cloud storage into Microsoft 365 Apps. personal files, as email attachments will soon count towards OneDrive quotas.

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The change is coming in February, so those affected have some time to research an alternative cloud storage solution or consider upgrading to a more generous OneDrive tier.

Whether or not the policy change affects you will really depend on how you use Outlook.com or, indeed, if. If you’re the kind of person who gets a lot of attachments, or even someone who uses attachments as a way to increase cloud storage by emailing files to you, the impact could be huge. .

Microsoft barely shouted about the changes, but reveals more in a support document:

Starting February 1, 2023, cloud storage used in Microsoft 365 apps and services will include Outlook.com attachment data and OneDrive data. All data will continue to be protected by Microsoft’s comprehensive set of security features.

This update will not affect the amount of storage in your Outlook.com mailbox. However, this can reduce the amount of cloud storage you have to use your OneDrive. If you reach your cloud storage quota, your ability to send and receive email in Outlook.com will be impacted.

The company goes on to elaborate on what counts towards your OneDrive storage quota:

  • OneDrive files and photos, for example:
    • Personal files that you store, upload, and sync from your computer or mobile device, such as Office documents, mobile camera roll, screenshots, and other files and photos that have been saved to your OneDrive, including Desktop, Documents, and Pictures folders.
    • All items in your trash.
  • Outlook.com attachments.
  • Teams message attachments and records.

Image credit: rafapress / depotphotos

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